Historical Naval Mystery Solved

May 09, 2015



Disclaimer: This list is NOT all inclusive. US Special Operations have dozens of firearms at their disposal. This list is just a sampling and is arranged in NO particular order.

     FN SCAR

The Special Operations Forces Combat Assault Rifle (SCAR) is a modular rifle made by FN Herstal (FNH) for the United States Special Operations Command (SOCOM) to satisfy the requirements of the SCAR competition. This family of rifles consist of two main types. The SCAR-L, for "light", is chambered in the 5.56×45mm NATO cartridge and the SCAR-H, for "heavy", fires 7.62×51mm NATO. Both are available in Long Barrel and Close Quarters Combat variants.

10 Guns of the Special Forces

10 Guns of the Special Forces

10 Guns of the Special Forces

Pictured Above: FN MK 20 MOD 0 Sniper Support Rifle (SSR)
Cartridge
  • 5.56×45mm NATO(SCAR-L)
  • 7.62×51mm NATO(SCAR-H)
Action Gas-operated (short-stroke gas piston), rotating bolt
Rate of fire 625 rounds/min
Muzzle velocity
  • SCAR-L: 2,870 ft/s (870 m/s) (M855)
  • SCAR-L: 2,630 ft/s (800 m/s) (Mk 262)
  • SCAR-H: 2,342 ft/s (714 m/s) (M80)
Effective firing range
  • SCAR-L: 300 m (330 yd) (Short), 500 m (550 yd) (Standard), 600 m (660 yd) (Long)
  • SCAR-H: 300 m (330 yd) (Short), 600 m (660 yd) (Standard), 800 m (870 yd) (Long)
Feed system
  • SCAR-L: STANAG box magazine
  • SCAR-H/SSR: 20-round box magazine
Sights Iron sights or various optics

FULL FN SCAR SPECS HERE

 

  Words by Cameron Dunn.

The Japanese I-400 submarine utilized during World War II has been discovered by researchers at the University of Hawaii and the national Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on the bottom of the Pacific Ocean 2,300 feet below the surface off the Island of Oahu after over half a century of mystery surrounding its whereabouts.  The actual discovery took place in August but the announcement was made yesterday after the findings were finally confirmed with the U.S. state department and Japanese government officials.  The sub was thought to be further out to sea which made the discovery so surprising.

Historical Naval Mystery Solved 

Photo courtesy of operationstormbook.com

This boat holds great historical significance as being one of Japans major engineering accomplishments.  Designed to launch stealth airstrikes against the U.S., the I-400 was the first of three Japanese submarines equip with airstrike capabilities.  This boat was suited with sonar-damping technology and could house three Aichi M6A Seiran aircraft to deploy against enemy targets.  It also had the ability to travel one and a half times around the globe without having to refuel and could deploy three bombers within minutes of resurfacing.  The original plan to build a total of 18 of this type of boat was never accomplished.

Historical Naval Mystery Solved 

Photo courtesy of pbs.org

The I-400 submarine was captured by a U.S. Navy destroyer at the end of the war and kept along with four other Japanese submarines at Pearl Harbor with the intention of inspecting in the future.  However, as the Cold War was just beginning and tensions mounted with the Soviet Union who were demanding to have the submarines made accessible to them under terms of a World War II treaty, the U.S. Navy scuttled the submarines.  They did not want that kind of technology in the hands of the Soviets. The Navy claimed ignorance and said they did not have any idea of the whereabouts of the submarines.

Historical Naval Mystery Solved 

Photo courtesy of newsmax.com

With the discovery of the I-400 submarine, the Hawaii Undersea Research laboratory has now located four of the five scuttled subs.