Air Force Cracking Down on BAH Documentation

May 09, 2015



Disclaimer: This list is NOT all inclusive. US Special Operations have dozens of firearms at their disposal. This list is just a sampling and is arranged in NO particular order.

     FN SCAR

The Special Operations Forces Combat Assault Rifle (SCAR) is a modular rifle made by FN Herstal (FNH) for the United States Special Operations Command (SOCOM) to satisfy the requirements of the SCAR competition. This family of rifles consist of two main types. The SCAR-L, for "light", is chambered in the 5.56×45mm NATO cartridge and the SCAR-H, for "heavy", fires 7.62×51mm NATO. Both are available in Long Barrel and Close Quarters Combat variants.

10 Guns of the Special Forces

10 Guns of the Special Forces

10 Guns of the Special Forces

Pictured Above: FN MK 20 MOD 0 Sniper Support Rifle (SSR)
Cartridge
  • 5.56×45mm NATO(SCAR-L)
  • 7.62×51mm NATO(SCAR-H)
Action Gas-operated (short-stroke gas piston), rotating bolt
Rate of fire 625 rounds/min
Muzzle velocity
  • SCAR-L: 2,870 ft/s (870 m/s) (M855)
  • SCAR-L: 2,630 ft/s (800 m/s) (Mk 262)
  • SCAR-H: 2,342 ft/s (714 m/s) (M80)
Effective firing range
  • SCAR-L: 300 m (330 yd) (Short), 500 m (550 yd) (Standard), 600 m (660 yd) (Long)
  • SCAR-H: 300 m (330 yd) (Short), 600 m (660 yd) (Standard), 800 m (870 yd) (Long)
Feed system
  • SCAR-L: STANAG box magazine
  • SCAR-H/SSR: 20-round box magazine
Sights Iron sights or various optics

FULL FN SCAR SPECS HERE

 

  Words by Wes O'Donnell.

Members of the Air Force must prepare themselves to submit documentation to re-verify dependent information as part of an Air Force-wide audit readiness effort.  This is being done to ensure that the funds the Air Force spends on basic housing allowance yearly are auditable. This push to improve financial audit readiness comes from the 2010 National Defense Authorization Act.

Air Force Cracking Down on BAH Documentation

Photo courtesy of usmclife.com

Among the documents that will be necessary to provide are marriage certificates, children's birth certificates, child support documentation and divorce decrees.  Airmen will be receiving an email when it is their turn to submit documentation.  These emails will be sent out through this December and indicate to each individual airmen which documents will be necessary for them to provide.  At that point the airman then must provide this documentation within 30 days or they could potentially have their BAH reduced to the singles rate.  Exceptions will be made for those airmen who are deployed, on extended leave or on temporary duty.

The problem the Air Force financial officials are having is not that they feel they are improperly paying out benefits to airman, but some of the documentation that would be required for an audit has already been disposed of.  Records are usually only kept for approximately six years and then they are discarded.  The problem that has been found is that those airmen who experienced a life change such as another child, a change in rank, a marriage or divorce after a significant amount of time from the first submission of documentation are finding that their original documents have already been discarded when attempting to add the new information.  Verification as to these airmen's eligibility in regards to BAH are still available, however, the paper documentation necessary for audits performed years after the serviceman has first receive benefits may not be complete. 

Air Force Cracking Down on BAH Documentation

Photo courtesy of usmilitary.com

With current tight military budget cuts it is important, now more than ever, to account for every dollar spent and be able to show documented proof of where that money has been allocated.