7 Privately Owned Vehicle Processing Centers for Deployed Troops to Close on May 1st

May 09, 2015



Disclaimer: This list is NOT all inclusive. US Special Operations have dozens of firearms at their disposal. This list is just a sampling and is arranged in NO particular order.

     FN SCAR

The Special Operations Forces Combat Assault Rifle (SCAR) is a modular rifle made by FN Herstal (FNH) for the United States Special Operations Command (SOCOM) to satisfy the requirements of the SCAR competition. This family of rifles consist of two main types. The SCAR-L, for "light", is chambered in the 5.56×45mm NATO cartridge and the SCAR-H, for "heavy", fires 7.62×51mm NATO. Both are available in Long Barrel and Close Quarters Combat variants.

10 Guns of the Special Forces

10 Guns of the Special Forces

10 Guns of the Special Forces

Pictured Above: FN MK 20 MOD 0 Sniper Support Rifle (SSR)
Cartridge
  • 5.56×45mm NATO(SCAR-L)
  • 7.62×51mm NATO(SCAR-H)
Action Gas-operated (short-stroke gas piston), rotating bolt
Rate of fire 625 rounds/min
Muzzle velocity
  • SCAR-L: 2,870 ft/s (870 m/s) (M855)
  • SCAR-L: 2,630 ft/s (800 m/s) (Mk 262)
  • SCAR-H: 2,342 ft/s (714 m/s) (M80)
Effective firing range
  • SCAR-L: 300 m (330 yd) (Short), 500 m (550 yd) (Standard), 600 m (660 yd) (Long)
  • SCAR-H: 300 m (330 yd) (Short), 600 m (660 yd) (Standard), 800 m (870 yd) (Long)
Feed system
  • SCAR-L: STANAG box magazine
  • SCAR-H/SSR: 20-round box magazine
Sights Iron sights or various optics

FULL FN SCAR SPECS HERE

 

  Words by Bridget Foster.

The Department of Defense has changed contractors handling the shipping and storage of privately owned vehicles, resulting in the closure of seven centers effective May 1.  International Auto Logistics (IAL) a subsidiary of International Auto Processing, won the $305 million contract back in October and will provide shipping and storing services through the end of September 2015.

7 Privately Owned Vehicle Processing Centers for Deployed Troops to Close on May 1st

The decision to close the seven centers was based on an analysis of how many vehicles were being processed through the centers, which is directly related to the number of troops assigned in areas where the sites are located. Four of the closed centers are in the continental United States: Edison, NJ; Richmond, CA; New Orleans, LA; and Orlando, FL. The remaining three centers that are closing are in Europe: RAF Croughton and RAF Menwith Hill, which are located in England; and the VPC in Seville, Spain. (There are actually eight centers closing because the Mannheim, Germany VPC was closed earlier due to military reorganization). After May 1, there will be 35 processing centers left in operation.

According to Navy Capt. Aaron Stanley, director of the Personal Property directorate for the Surface Deployment and Distribution Command, a decision to close the Livorno, Italy and Schweinfurt, Germany centers has been postponed. The seven closing facilities will accept new vehicles for processing up until April 30 but employees of the previous contractor, American Auto Logistics, will be available at the closed facilities through August 1 to service vehicles that have already been processed; the facilities will remain open until all of those vehicles have been delivered to their owners.

7 Privately Owned Vehicle Processing Centers for Deployed Troops to Close on May 1st

Servicemembers with vehicles currently in the VPC system will continue to be able to track the shipments of their vehicles through American Auto Logistics website until all vehicles have been delivered.  The new website for International Auto Logistics is www.pcsmypov.com.

Under the contract, 18 new VPCs (nine in the US and nine overseas) have been established in the same cities as currently operating VPCs but at different locations. The remaining 17 VPCs will stay in the same buildings but will close for the first two days in May so that the transition can take place. Only emergency drop-offs will be accepted on those two days and the centers will reopen for all vehicles on May 5. 

7 Privately Owned Vehicle Processing Centers for Deployed Troops to Close on May 1st

“Our focus is for a seamless transition,” said Stanley.  “We don’t see the need for any major changes in the process used to ship and store privately owned vehicles.”  SDDC officials have been meeting daily with International Auto Logistics to ensure the smooth transition of services.

“We are very happy to be able to serve our servicemembers. We want this to be a smooth transition for them,” said Doug Tipton, CEO and President of IAL.  Tipton also stated that International Auto Logistics places a priority on hiring veterans and that in many instances, it will be veterans serving their fellow servicemembers.

A pdf of the April 15 SDDC advisory listing phone numbers to call and details about VPC locations can be found here.